Technical Assistance

Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway

Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Entryway piers
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
July 4,1907
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
1907
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Entryway piers have deteriorated over time
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Entryway pier
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Entryway pier
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Grant to Help Garibaldi-Meucci Museum Restore Entryway
Entryway pier

December 20, 2012

The Garibaldi-Meucci Museum is housed in a circa 1849 Gothic Revival style cottage in the Rosebank section of Staten Island. The site was designated an Individual Landmark in 1969 and was listed on the National Register in 1980.

The small museum “supports, celebrates, educates and helps unite the Italian-American Community. Its mission is to collect, preserve and exhibit material relating to the lives of inventor Antonio Meucci and Italian hero Giuseppe Garibaldi.”

Among other things, Meucci developed an electromagnetic voice communication apparatus which he named the “telettrofono” and is often credited as the first telephone. Garibaldi, who would later become famous for leading the “Risorgimento” to unite the Italian states, arrived in New York City in 1850 seeking political refuge. Meucci took him into his home and the two worked in Meucci’s tallow candle factory until 1854. Garibaldi returned to Italy and won worldwide fame as one of the founding fathers of the newly united Italian nation.

When Garibaldi died in 1884, a committee was founded to commemorate his stay on Staten Island. After Meucci’s death, the house was turned over to the Italian community to be preserved as a memorial to Garibaldi.

In 1907, the centennial of Garibaldi’s birth, the house was moved to its current location and a huge classical style pantheon was erected over it. The Order Sons of Italy in America have run the house since 1919. With help from the cultural department of the Italian Embassy, artifacts were collected from around the world. In 1956 the house was opened to the public and rededicated as the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum.

Although the pantheon is long gone, the 1907 fence and gates around the property survive. The cottage is set back behind that fence and gateway. Four tall masonry piers frame the entrance gates. These piers have deteriorated over time and during Hurricane Sandy, several pieces of masonry broke off and fell to the ground. Due to the location of the piers adjacent to a public sidewalk and near a bus stop, their condition needs to be addressed immediately.

The Conservancy’s emergency grant will pay for the repair of the piers with the goal of restoring them to their circa 1907 appearance.