Technical Assistance

Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island

Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
1796 Sculpture
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
1796 Sculpture
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Grand gateway or sally port of Fort Jay
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Fort Jay, Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Detail of Fort Jay sculpture
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Back of sculpture
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Detail of Fort Jay sculpture
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Detail of Fort Jay sculpture
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Stabilization of Fort Jay Eagle Sculpture on Governors Island
Back of sculpture

The Conservancy’s director of technical services is participating in a two-day brainstorming session (or charrette) on Governor’s Island hosted by the National Park Service. Experts are exploring various possible preservation and stabilization strategies for the magnificent sculpture atop the entry portal to Fort Jay.

The grand gateway was constructed in 1796 and consists of a sandstone structure with a carved “trophée d’armes” on top. The sculpture consists of an eagle with spread wings holding a shield atop a wheeled cannon. This is one of the earliest, if not the earliest, American monumental stone fort decorations. The eagle has undergone a number of changes over the years. Several elements are missing and there is extensive patchwork throughout the structure. The “Eagle Charrette” is engaging a group of professionals on site who are debating the range of conservation treatments for this important artifact.

Fort Jay is a Renaissance-inspired, five-pointed military fortification surrounded by a dry moat in the northern portion of the island. It is one of two forts on the Island that together constitute a National Monument run by the Park Service.

Read more about the history and conservation of this important sculpture at the National Park Service website.