Technical Assistance

Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark

Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark
Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark
Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark
Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark
Image of the roof structure of the Manee Seguine house by Donald Friedman
Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark
Conservancy Funds Report To Help Save Staten Island Landmark

July 30, 2013

Thanks to a Conservancy funded engineer’s report, the Landmarks Commission is in active discussions with the owner of the Manee-Seguine Homestead to make needed repairs to this unusual individual landmark.

One of the city’s oldest houses, the Manee-Seguine Homestead, also known as the Abraham Manee House, came perilously close to being lost forever. Located on the waterfront in Prince’s Bay near the southern tip of Staten Island, the house has a complex history that may extend back to the construction of a one-room dwelling by Paulus Regrenier in the late 17th century. A major rubble-stone addition was constructed early in the 18th century by Abraham Manee. Further additions were made by the Seguine family who acquired the property in 1780.

Already in poor condition, the house was further battered by Sandy in 2012. After the storm, the owners informed the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) that the house was too damaged to be salvaged. The LPC then turned to the Conservancy and asked us to fund an engineer’s assessment of the house’s structural condition.

The Conservancy retained engineer Donald Friedman of Old Structures to inspect the house and produce a report. Mr. Friedman visited the site in June and prepared a detailed description of the building’s condition. The report concludes that the house is in poor condition due to weathering and lack of maintenance but that it is not in imminent danger of collapse. It then goes on to list, one by one, the structural repairs that are needed to stabilize and preserve the house -including repairs to the roof.

The Conservancy is glad to assist the LPC in their ongoing effort to preserve this remarkable piece of Staten Island history.