Sacred Sites Program

Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000

Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
-St. Joan of Arc Church, Jackson Heights Historic District, Queens Lehman & Murphy 1928; W.A. Schlusing & E. Steinback 1941-1951
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
-St. Joan of Arc Church, Parapet Reconstruction, Masonry & Roof Drainage Repair
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
-Beth-El Temple, Church of God in Christ, Far Rockaway 1858, Richard Upjohn
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
Conservancy Awards 16 Grants totaling $241,000
-Beth-El Temple, Church of God in Christ, Leaded Glass Restoration

The Conservancy’s Sacred Sites Committee met and approved 16 new grants totaling $241,000 on October 9th helping landmark religious properties statewide implement exterior repair and restoration projects. The Conservancy’s grantees host numerous community, social, and cultural activities in addition to worship services. Grants for projects such as roof, masonry, and window restoration ensure these activities will happen in dry, warm, and safe environments.

VIEW SLIDESHOW OF ALL GRANTEES

Grants in New York City include St. Joan of Arc Church, a Roman Catholic Church in the locally designated Jackson Heights Historic District. Founded in 1920, the parish was the first in America to be named for St. Joan of Arc. In 1928, the site was cleared for the foundation of a planned cathedral, but the Great Depression and then World War II postponed construction. Although architect W. A. Schlusing completed plans in 1941, construction was completed only a decade later.

The red- rick and limestone, neo-Romanesque church has steeply pitched gables, a large polygonal apse, and a tower at the rear. The parish complex, of matching red brick, includes a large neo-Gothic rectory constructed in 1926; a 1924 school with a 1937 addition; and a neo-Gothic convent constructed in 1940-1941. A one-story, International Style meeting hall is the final building, completed in 1960-1961.

The church sponsors activities that reach about 10,000 people a year including concerts and recitals, clothing drives, health seminars, and financial planning workshops. The parochial elementary school has an afterschool program and hosts a Cub Scout troop. There is a weekday preschool and ongoing counseling programs.

A $25,000 Sacred Sites Grant at the church will help fund a $200,000 portion of an overall $1.1 million parapet, masonry, and roof drainage repair project. Work will consist of removing the existing parapet coping stones at the roofline and reinstalling with adequate waterproofing underneath; flashing repairs; repointing mortar joints and replacing broken bricks; replacing rusted steel lintels; adding new decorative metal collection boxes and downspouts; and lining the existing decorative gutters.

The other New York City grant awarded in this round was to Beth-El Temple, Church of God in Christ. Located in Rockaway, Queens the congregation was pledged a $5,000 to support stained-glass restoration at this 1858 Gothic Revival-style church designed by renowned architect Richard Upjohn.

There were 14 additional Sacred Sites grants, ranging from $3,000 to $35,000, from Southold on Long Island’s North Fork to Buffalo. Five of these grants in Suffolk County were underwritten by new Conservancy supporter the Robert David Lion Foundation. The grants went to the United Methodist Church of Patchogue (1890), Bethel A.M.E. Church in Setauket (1909), St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Northport (1873), First Congregational Church in Riverhead (1836), and First Congregational Church in Southold (1803).