EZ Grants

From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters

From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
A Beautiful Harlem Landmark
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
Before: Mary Kay Judy points out missing gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
After: Copper Gutter Replacement
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
Before: Inspecting deteriorated hatch and missing gutter
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
After: New Hatch, Gutter, Kemper Roof, Cap & Base Flashing
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
Pawel Gluszczyszyn of TS General Renovation
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
From Fire to Fabulous – EZ Grant Crowns Metropolitan Baptist Church with New Copper Gutters
L to R: Pawel Gluszczyszyn of TS General Renovation, Rev. McDaniels, consultant Mary Kay Judy, and Ann-Isabel Friedman and Intern Tyler Rubin of the Conservancy

June 2012

Every time it rained, it flowed. The waterfall “feature” at the heart of Metropolitan Baptist’s daily food pantry is no more, thanks to a $50,000 Conservancy EZ grant.

A brand new areaway drain in the “moat” surrounding the church ensures that water no longer surges over the threshold and under the food pantry door with every heavy rain. The new drain was accompanied by two new Kemper roofs, copper flashing, a new roof hatch, and four new sections of copper gutter and downspouts, all installed by TS General Restoration, under the guidance of Architectural Conservator and construction manager Mary Kay Judy.

The congregation augmented the EZ grant with $14,000 to complete the $64,000 project. The Pastor, Rev. Bobbie McDaniels, attended weekly site visits via ladder and scaffold throughout the month-long construction project, and was able to communicate his first-hand observations to his trustees and congregation.

Metropolitan Baptist Church at 151 West 128th Street in Harlem was constructed in two phases, in 1884-85 and 1889-90, and is an individual New York City landmark, featuring a striking conical slate roof. Project planning began in 2009 – but in the summer of 2010, a fire destroyed the pastor’s office and damaged a bay window facing 128th Street, delaying the project. (See Prior Conservancy article)

Happily, this summer’s roof and drainage restoration coincides with the completion of post-fire interior restoration. The new roofs will protect the newly renewed interior finishes, and the new gutters ensure that a plywood “canopy” will no longer be needed to protect visitors from being pelted with water runoff from the enormous conical slate roof!

EZ-grants of a maximum of $50,000 have been awarded to fund architectural services and restoration work at landmark and landmark-quality religious-owned properties in Upper Manhattan. To date, the $300,000 fund, a program capitalized by the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone and administered by the Conservancy, has assisted five Upper Manhattan churches to fund preservation planning costs and begin to implement restoration, launching restoration projects ranging from a few thousand to over $1 million each. The Metropolitan Baptist project is an example of the Conservancy’s incremental, right-sized approach to restoration, and we look forward to continuing to work with the congregation on roof, window, and masonry restoration in the coming years.