Emergency Preservation Grants

Hopper Home Portico Restored

Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
-1966 (photo:LPC)
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
-before portico restoration
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
-after (photo: Lauren Martino)
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
-(photo: Lauren Martino)
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
-(photo: Lauren Martino)
Hopper Home Portico Restored
Hopper Home Portico Restored
-(photo: Lauren Martino)

August 2014

The Conservancy and the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) together helped fund the restoration of a landmark East Village row house that figured prominently in 19th-century social reform.

With the Conservancy and the LPC each providing $24,500 in grant funding, the restoration of the distinctive brownstone portico and base of the Isaac T. Hopper Home at 110 Second Avenue in Manhattan was completed this month.

Designated as an individual City landmark, Hopper Home was built for the merchant Mead family in 1838. A fine example of the Greek Revival style, it is the sole survivor of four identical town houses that were built together. It served as a residence until 1874 when it was purchased by the Women’s Prison Association (“WPA”), which started as the Female Department of the Prison Association of New York. This organization was founded in 1845 by Isaac T. Hopper and his daughter, Abigail Hopper Gibbons, and changed its name to WPA in 1854. The Hoppers were Quakers, abolitionists, and ardent prison reform advocates. The 1874 birthday of the Isaac T. Hopper Home makes it the oldest halfway house for women prisoners in the world. It still serves as an office and residential facility for WPA.

The Conservancy’s involvement with Hopper Home dates to 2012, when an initial Conservancy grant of $12,000 underwrote a conditions review and construction documents by Easton Architects for the entire property. The survey called out the deteriorated state of the building’s brownstone entryway with its Ionic fluted columns as a first priority to be addressed in any restoration program. Easton Architects oversaw the portico work, which was carried out by contractor Progeny Restoration.