Emergency Preservation Grants

Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building

Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
-Gutter over Bay Window/Detaching Scupper
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
-8 Henderson Place (both buildings)
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
-Gutter over Bay Window/Detaching Scupper
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
-Room with Art Work of both Hilda Terry and Gregory D’Alessio
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
-Room with Art Work of both Hilda Terry and Gregory D’Alessio
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
Emergency Grant Helps Henderson Place Building
-Parlor

Tucked away on the upper east side of Manhattan, north of 86th Street and west of East End Avenue, is the small Henderson Place Historic District. The 24 Queen Anne style row houses there were designated in 1969. The architectural firm of Lamb and Rich designed the original grouping of 32 in 1881. The house at number 8 was the longtime home of Gregory D’Alessio and his wife, Hilda Terry, both acclaimed cartoonists and artists in other media. Their house served for many years as a gathering place for their famous friends, who included Carl Sandburg and Andres Segovia. In 1975, the 8 Henderson Place Foundation was established to preserve the legacies of D’Alessio and Terry through archiving their work and establishing a house museum.

The building, vacant since the death of Ms. Terry in 2006, still contains numerous oils, drawings, books, and other artifacts of the owners. The Foundation owns the property now and is seeking financing to fulfill its mission. Its treasurer contacted the Conservancy in late 2014 about a large, wooden bay window that was visibly shifting out of position. The Conservancy enlisted the help of architect Jonathan Raible, who quickly sketched out a way of stabilizing the window in place and repairing the gutter above to prevent the water penetration that had caused the problem in the first place. This work was completed in the spring of 2015 using an emergency grant of $7,175.

The Emergency Preservation Grant Program of the Conservancy has assisted dozens of historic nonprofit facilities since its inception in 1999. The grantees comprise a diverse group, which includes house museums, community centers, a fireboat, cemetery monuments, supportive housing facilities, and a lighthouse. Funded largely by The New York Community Trust, the program offers grants and project management assistance to address immediately needed repairs and hazardous conditions.